There are many misconceptions about high altitude flight and how it is achieved, whether that be through the use of turbocharger or supercharger engines and their application of forced induction systems. As most general aviation piston engines are typically aspirated, this results in various flight instructors, commercial pilots, and private pilots who have minimal practical experience working with forced induction systems. To get a better understanding of how turbochargers and superchargers compare and contrast, we will briefly go over how they work, allowing you to use this information for future applications.


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Spark plugs are used in a variety of vehicles to deliver electric current to the combustion chamber to ignite the fuel/air mixture during the appropriate phase of the engine cycle. While most recognize spark plugs through their association with automobiles, these components play a crucial role in many aircraft to facilitate continuous engine operation. When it comes to aviation, the spark plug is exposed to unique challenges and is therefore explicitly designed to perform its task. In this blog, we will discuss everything you need to know about spark plugs in aircraft, including their design, operation, and maintenance.


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In aviation, hydraulic systems are the backbone of aircraft, allowing pilots to carry out flight plans with ease. Hydraulic systems operate by driving machinery via fluid pressurization. These systems are responsible for powering other aircraft systems such as landing gear, flight controls, brakes, cargo doors, and thrust reversers. As such, they perform the function of moving and actuating both critical and basic components within aircraft. To understand the importance of hydraulic systems, this blog will provide a brief overview of how they work.


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Born out of necessity and applied by professionals, the goal for an aircraft engine is reliability. Unlike other vehicles where power is their primary concern, aircraft designers focus on ensuring these machines can be relied upon in any situation without fail – which means they are not just built to move forward.


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A vast majority of aircraft necessitate electrical power to perform standard flight procedures such as taxiing, landing, and operating navigation equipment within the cockpit. The typical electrical systems within aircraft consist of a battery and an alternator or generator, all of which are connected via several meters of wire.


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Across all piston-powered aircraft, the two primary fuel systems are the carburetor and fuel-injection system. While most general aviation aircraft initially relied on carburetor systems, fuel-injection systems have quickly risen in popularity in past years. The fuel-injection system holds various advantages over its counterpart, its benefits ranging from increased safety to improved performance. As a result, fuel-injection systems can be beneficial for many pilots depending on their needs. In this blog, we will discuss the design and functionality of the fuel injection system, allowing you to better understand how they work and provide fuel for flight.


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The formation of ice across an aircraft and its systems is detrimental to flight operations, potentially disrupting airflow, reducing efficiency, and causing other various issues. For aircraft that feature propeller assemblies, ice commonly forms in a number of areas such as the propeller leading edges, cuffs, and spinner. As such, it is important that there are means for removal. Aircraft deice systems are quite popular for aircraft propeller assemblies, often taking advantage of electrical heating elements and chemical deicing fluids for protection.


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Not all aircraft achieve flight through the same methods of propulsion. Whether classified as a lighter-than-air or heavier-than-air vehicle, aircraft can be categorized based on the type of propulsion system it utilizes to generate forward movement. Developed from earlier forms of aircraft employing internal combustion engines to power rotary engine technology, aircraft and their use of propellers have evolved over the decades to suit piston and turboprop engine types. However, as engines grew in size to support larger, more powerful aircraft, propellers had to follow suit. Manufactured for specific engine capabilities, a propeller’s design is directly related to its generated thrust and must be capable of counterbalancing an engine’s power to ensure optimal performance.


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In order for an aircraft to achieve ample flight control throughout an operation, they often rely on a number of flight surfaces and devices that affect aerodynamics and heading. Aircraft spoilers are common devices that are found on numerous assemblies, used to reduce aerofoil lift in a controlled manner. Through the intentional reduction of lift, the aircraft spoilers generate a controlled stall over the rear portion of the wing. As airplane hardware parts that enable more control over aerodynamics during various flight procedures, having an understanding of how spoilers and roll spoilers function is crucial for any current or aspiring pilot.


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For a majority of aircraft, propulsion and flight is made possible through the combustion of fuel and air mixtures within an engine. For an aircraft piston engine in particular, such systems will burn fuel within cylinders, creating the necessary reciprocal power needed to drive propellers. This continuous operation throughout a flight can result in high amounts of heat and exhaust within the system, requiring the expulsion of spent fuel to reduce pressure, mitigate heat, and more. The expulsion of such matter and heat is achieved through the use of the aircraft exhaust system, that of which contains a number of important parts and characteristics that ensure the efficiency and wellbeing of aircraft and their engines. 


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