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What Is the Aircraft Carburetor System?

For an aircraft engine to properly provide enough propulsion to sustain high altitude heavier-than-air flight, it requires specific mixtures of oxygen and fuel for combustion. To provide these mixtures, the aircraft utilizes a carburetor for creating the correct mixture ratios of fuel and oxygen needed for operation. As this process must be extremely accurate and precise to properly function and avoid risks, the aircraft engine carburetor is designed with advanced engineering to manage power settings, mixture control, temperature, and more. In this blog, we will discuss what an aircraft carburetor is, as well as how it provides optimal fuel to air mixtures for aircraft.

While most of modern energy powering of systems is achieved through the combustion of hydrocarbons, such as fossil fuels, oxygen is needed to create a combustion chemical reaction to fully utilize such fuel. As aircraft are immensely heavy objects operating at high altitudes for extended periods of time, mixing fuel and air together is very critical for aviation operation and the aircraft exhaust system. Typically, an optimal ratio of fuel to oxygen lies between 1:9 and 1:18. In more simple terms, for every 1 part fuel, 9 to 18 parts oxygen is needed. 1:9 mixture ratios are considered rich, while ratios closer to 1:18 are more lean. Rich ratios for the aircraft engine are best when travelling while idling, while lean mixtures mostly serve for cruising speeds. With aircraft hardware parts such as carburetors, such mixtures can be achieved throughout flight with ease.

Across many aircraft types, the most common aircraft engine carburetor is the float carburetor. This apparatus is one that features a chamber with a float inside. Within the chamber, fuel is filled and is regulated by the float. With an aviation metering system, fuel may enter the venturi and pressure drops until it begins to vaporize. At this time, the mixture is transferred through the induction system to the engine to create the combustion gases needed for the aircraft exhaust system. With evaporation and pressure drops during fuel-air mixture vaporization, there comes a risk of ice formation within the venturi and throttle valve where there is moisture. To avoid this, carburetor heat may be applied to the system in order to prevent ice formation.

When travelling at higher altitudes, it is also important to understand that the amount of oxygen density in air decreases, thus changes to the mixture needs to be made by the carburetor to accommodate for it. As the density of oxygen decreases, the amount of fuel mixed together is simultaneously lowered as well to ensure that a mixture does not become too rich. To achieve this process, the throat of the venturi will supply back suction forces to reduce fuel flow. Often, carburetors and other aircraft hardware parts may feature an automatic system to remove the duty of adjusting carburetor fuel flow from the pilot.

When it comes time to begin sourcing the carburetor components and aircraft hardware parts that you need for your operations, ASAP AM Spares has you covered with everything you are searching for. ASAP AM Spares is owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, and we can help you find the aviation, NSN, and electronic parts that you are searching for, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. ASAP Semiconductor is an FAA 0056B accredited and AS9120B, ISO 9001:2015 certified enterprise. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asap-amspares.com or call us at +1-702-919-1616.


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February 27, 2020

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